• Answering the NAS: The Ethics of Leadership and the Leadership of Ethics

    With increased attention being paid to forensic laboratories, it is important for lab personnel to adhere to the highest ethical standards. This course continues the ethics materials presented in “To Hell and Back: The Ethics of Stewardship and the Stewardship of Ethics” by discussing more leadership styles and how these styles affect ethics in the workplace. Case studies are a focus of this module and are examined in more detail. The format of the module will be a live, interactive classroom, allowing participants to discuss questions with the presenter and other participants.

    $28.50
  • Expert Testimony Training for the Prosecutor and Scientist I

    Many toxicologists must provide courtroom testimony in support of analyses conducted in their laboratory. This course provides a primer on expert testimony issues communicated from a prosecutorial perspective. Material in the module includes a discussion of rules of evidence, including Frye and Daubert. The course also discusses basic components of most testimony, including voi dire, direct and cross-examinations. Strategies and example testimonies are also provided.

    $19.00
  • Expert Testimony Training for the Prosecutor and Scientist II

    Due to the popularity of the Expert Testimony I course, a second section has been added. Section II will cover expert testimony for the forensic toxicologist and will be lab oriented. Material in the module includes a discussion of rules of evidence, including Frye and Daubert standards; a discussion of the role of the laboratory; legal cases, testing, and retrograde BAC calculation considerations.

    $19.00
  • Fundamentals of Chromatography used in Toxicology

    The goal of this course is to enhance the participant’s understanding of general chromatography principles and gas and liquid chromatography, the chromatographic techniques currently used for the detection of drugs or metabolites in forensic drug testing. When a specimen has a positive initial drug test result, laboratories must perform a confirmatory drug test to identify and quantify the specific drug or drug metabolite.

    The use of an analytical method combining chromatography and mass spectrometry is most commonly used for the confirmatory drug test. This module focuses on the chromatographic technologies used in these coupled methods. The format of the module will be an on demand, interactive classroom.

    $78.00
  • Fundamentals of Immunoassay Testing Used in Toxicology

    This training is designed for forensic toxicologists with some familiarity with sample screening. The course provides information about the use, theory and techniques of commonly used immunoassays for forensic toxicology analyses. The goal of this training program is to enhance the participant’s understanding of immunoassay theory, immunoassay techniques used for the detection of drugs or metabolites, and the implementation of immunoassays in the forensic toxicology laboratory.

    Immunoassay is routinely used in forensic toxicology to evaluate biological samples—such as urine, blood, oral fluid, or hair—for the presumptive presence of drugs or other toxins of interest. Toxicology laboratories routinely use immunoassays for screening and presumptive determinations on samples.

    $58.50
  • Fundamentals of LC/MS/MS

    This introductory course provides information on LC/MS/MS, including the basics of liquid chromatography, interface methods between LC and MS/MS, and primary MS/MS technologies currently available. This course includes a review of triple quad and other combinations, such as quad-trap and quad TOF.

    $28.50
  • Fundamentals of Mass Spectrometry used in Toxicology

    This module will review combining chromatography and mass spectrometry for the confirmatory test to identify and quantify the specific compound, drug, or drug metabolite. The purpose of mass spectrometry is to obtain a unique, reproducible fragmentation pattern of a particular molecular species. Whether a mass spectrometer uses a direct introduction source, gas chromatography (or GC), or liquid chromatography (or LC), some components are common for all instruments.

    Specifically, an ionization source is at the inlet, followed by a mass selective detector that allows for the selection of particular masses, and the final component is a detector that translates and amplifies the selected ion signal into an electronic signal sufficient for data processing. This course will cover these three components for the major types of nominal mass and higher-resolution mass spectrometer instrumentation currently available.

    $78.00
  • Fundamentals of Sample Preparation used in Toxicology

    This course addresses sample preparation techniques that may be used for confirmatory testing of urine, blood and tissue specimens in forensic drug testing laboratories. All specimens with positive initial drug test results must be analyzed using a confirmatory drug test to identify and quantify the specific drug or drug metabolite. Specimens routinely undergo sample preparation prior to confirmatory analysis. This course covers sample pre-treatment techniques, extraction theory as well as both solid phase and liquid phase extraction techniques, and derivatization.

    $78.00
  • How to Be a Good Expert Witness

    This presentation discusses the skills and practices necessary to be a good expert witness. Court is a unique place, and this course will provide an overview of the rules of court, as well as the rules for conduct and interaction. This course will explain the purpose of court and the role of the expert witness, as well as how to carry out that role properly, and the steps that any expert witness should take to prepare for court. Finally, the course will outline and describe various tactics and strategies sometimes used by attorneys to discredit witnesses.

    $58.50
  • Introduction to Uncertainty in Forensic Chemistry and Toxicology

    In the fields of forensic chemistry and toxicology, we are often asked to calculate critical quantitative values (e.g., mass, concentration, purity, or volume), but until recently, these values have been provided without much regard to how “sure” we are of those calculated values. Estimating the uncertainty of a critical measurement is a requirement for laboratories seeking and maintaining accreditation under an ISO 17025-based accreditation program. As with many unfamiliar concepts, measurement uncertainty seems to have introduced a new level of anxiety among many forensic scientists.

    $28.50
  • Investigative Strategies: Missing and Unidentified Person Cases

    This course covers a range of investigative strategies and considerations for handling missing and unidentified person cases. It is designed primarily for law enforcement, medical examiners, and coroners charged with the investigation of missing and unidentified person cases. However, it will also help family members of missing persons, victim advocates, and the general public gain a deeper understanding of the tools used in these investigations and the proper handling of sensitive information.

    $39.00
  • Specimen Validity Testing: The Workplace Experience

    This presentation provides an overview and historical perspective of Sample Validity Testing (SVT) in the U.S. It begins with a brief historical overview including: urine specimen tampering practices and identified adulterant and substitution products, the evolution of laboratory procedures for SVT, and the implementation of regulatory policies. As an example, the National Laboratory Certification Program or NLCP under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Workplace Programs in SAMHSA is presented. Next, the effects of several “model” adulterants are discussed. Lastly, current specimen validity evaluation approaches such as measurement of specimen temperature, physical characteristics, creatinine, specific gravity, pH, and oxidizing adulterants such as chromium, glutaraldehyde, pyridine and nitrite are discussed.

    $0.00
  • To Hell and Back: The Ethics of Stewardship and the Stewardship of Ethics

    With increased attention being paid to forensic laboratories, it is important for lab personnel to adhere to the highest ethical standards. This course continues the ethics material presented in “To Hell and Back: The Ethics of Stewardship and the Stewardship of Ethics” by discussing more leadership styles and how these styles affect ethics in the workplace.

    Case studies are a focus of this module and are examined in more detail. The format of the module will be a live, interactive classroom, allowing participants to discuss questions with the presenter and other participants.

    $28.50
  • Uncertainty in Forensic Chemistry and Toxicology: Part 2

    In the fields of forensic chemistry and toxicology, we are often asked to calculate critical quantitative values (e.g., mass, concentration, purity, or volume), but until recently, these values have been provided without much regard to how “sure” we are of those calculated values. Estimating the uncertainty of a critical measurement is a requirement for laboratories seeking and maintaining accreditation under an ISO 17025-based accreditation program. As with many unfamiliar concepts, measurement uncertainty seems to have introduced a new level of anxiety among many forensic scientists.

    $47.50
  • Uncertainty in Forensic Chemistry and Toxicology: Part 3

    In the fields of forensic chemistry and toxicology, we are often asked to calculate critical quantitative values (e.g., mass, concentration, purity, or volume), but until recently, these values have been provided without much regard to how “sure” we are of those calculated values. Estimating the uncertainty of a critical measurement is a requirement for laboratories seeking and maintaining accreditation under an ISO 17025-based accreditation program. As with many unfamiliar concepts, measurement uncertainty seems to have introduced a new level of anxiety among many forensic scientists.

    $38.00
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